Constitutional republic

Constitutional republic: Type of republic that operates under a system of separation of powers

A constitutional republic is a state where the chief executive and representatives are elected, and the rules are set down in a written constitution.

Diagram of the Federal Government and American Union, an example of a Constitutional Republic. This print was published in 1862.

The head of state and other representatives are elected but they do not have uncontrolled power. What their power is limited to is written in the constitution. If there is dispute about what the constitution means, this is decided by a court system that is independent from the representatives.

Constitutional republics usually have a separation of powers. The separation of powers means that no single officeholder gets unlimited power. John Adams said that a constitutional republic was "a government of laws, and not of men".[1]

Supporters of such a republic[who?] argue that it is meant to be a safeguard against tyranny. No office holder can get to a position of absolute power. However, some have argued that a constitution can be written in such a way that it lets tyranny arise, and that a constitution is therefore not a fail proof safeguard against tyranny.[2]

Aristotle was the first to write about the idea in his works on politics.

Constitutional monarchies are a special case: even though the monarch is not elected, the people still elect other governing bodies. The constitution also limits the power of the monarch.

Comparisons

Comparisons can be made. There are countries which nominally are constitutional republics, but which have become (in effect) dictatorships. There are also countries which have no written constitution, and are monarchies, but which act in a similar way to constitutional republics.

References

  1. Levinson, Sanford. 1989. Constitutional faith. Princeton University Press.
  2. Delattre, Edwin. 2002. Character and cops: ethics in policing, American Enterprise Institute, p. 16.

Related pages


🔥 Top trends keywords Simple English Wiki:

Main PageSpecial:Search24-hour clockPaul Green (rugby league)List of U.S. statesCarles PuigdemontSpecial:RecentChangesSlash (punctuation)AWiki:AboutList of U.S. state capitalsFlag of IndiaLogic gateMohs scale of mineral hardnessHelp:ContentsList of cities in FranceAbella DangerColourThe Dark Knight TrilogyEd LauterList of U.S. states and territories by time zoneList of U.S. states by populationList of people who have walked on the MoonTeenagerChuckle BrothersWiki:Text of Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported LicenseOld TestamentSchrödinger's catList of European countriesList of cities in ItalyFictional characterPlacentaEnglish languageWikiQuit India MovementProvinces and territories of CanadaList of sex positionsColor of the dayList of prime ministers of the United KingdomCristiano RonaldoLuka Magnotta2023 Formula One World ChampionshipMahatma GandhiList of mathematical symbolsSpecial:MyTalkColon (punctuation)IndiaAcademic grading in PhilippinesList of countriesGlobal warmingEastern Time ZoneCaféSardar Vallabhbhai PatelBlackSarvepalli RadhakrishnanRepublican Party (United States)List of U.S. states' largest citiesCatTipu SultanJagdeep DhankharList of fruitsKeyboard (computer)Traffic lightList of cities in the United KingdomComputerSubhas Chandra BoseEnvironmentTreeFantaList of countries by continents12-hour clockFrank O'ConnorList of Disney charactersIndependence Day (India)Arabic languageRabindranath TagoreB. R. AmbedkarList of largest Hindu templesBaskin-Robbins🡆 More